All Posts Tagged: coronavirus

Hay fever sufferer

The best ways to manage hay fever

Countless people across Melbourne suffer from hay fever. Are you one of them?

Medically known as allergic rhinitis, hay fever causes cold-like signs and symptoms. This can include things like runny nose, itchy eyes, congestion, sneezing and sinus pressure.

However, unlike a cold, hay fever isn’t caused by a virus.

Hay fever is caused by the nose and/or eyes coming into contact with environmental allergens, like pollen, dust mites, mould and even animal hair.

How do you manage hay fever?

The first thing you need to do is identify the allergens causing the symptoms.

In some cases the cause may be obvious. But in other cases, your doctor will need to consider your medical history and possibly order tests or a referral to a specialist in difficult cases.

Some medications may help relieve the symptoms of hay fever, such as:

  • Nasal sprays
  • Antihistamines (like Telfast and Claratyne)
  • Eye drops.

Some medications need a prescription while others don’t. It’s always best to ask your GP for advice.

How can you reduce symptoms?

There are ways to prevent or limit your hay fever symptoms, including:

  • In your garden, choose plants that are pollinated by birds or insects, rather than plants that release their seeds into the air
  • Splash your eyes often with cold water to flush out any allergen
  • Reduce your exposure to dust and dust mites, animals and animal hair or fur.

If you’re allergic to grass pollen, it can be difficult to avoid. However, when pollen levels are high the following advice may help:

  • Avoid being outdoors on very windy days and when there are thunderstorms
  • Avoid activities known to cause exposure to pollen, such as mowing grass
  • Shower after outdoor activities
  • Use re-circulated air in the car
  • Wear sunglasses
  • Dry your bedding and clothing inside.

Stay informed about pollen

It’s now easier than ever to know when the high pollen days are.

Just check this website or download the Melbourne Pollen Count app on your phone.

Does hay fever only affect people in spring?

Most people associate hay fever with spring, when airborne grass pollens are at their peak. This is known as seasonal allergic rhinitis or spring hay fever.

However, hay fever can occur at any time of the year. When symptoms occur all year round, this is known as perennial allergic rhinitis. This is usually caused by a reaction to allergens around the home, like dust mites and animal hair.

Hay fever or COVID-19?

Both hay fever and COVID-19 include respiratory symptoms. So, it’s easy to get them confused.

If you have respiratory symptoms and aren’t sure if it’s hay fever or COVID-19, just give us a call.

If you’ve never had hay fever before, you should you get a COVID-19 test straight away and then self-isolate until you get the results.

Get help for hay fever

If you suffer from persistent hay fever, have a chat with us about the best ways to manage it.

Spring is a beautiful season and we’d like to help you enjoy it!

Source: BetterHealth and ABC

Note: This information is of a general nature only and should not be substituted for medical advice. It does not replace consultations with qualified healthcare professionals to meet your individual medical needs. Page last updated 26 September 2021.

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AstraZenica COVID-19 vaccine

Information about the AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine

AstraZeneca is one of the COVID-19 vaccines. Here’s what you need to know.

What is the side effect that people are talking about?

There is evidence of a likely link between the AstraZeneca vaccine and an extremely rare blood clotting syndrome (thrombosis with thrombocytopenia). 

The recommendation from the Australian Technical Advisory Group on Immunisation (ATAGI) is that use of the Comirnaty COVID-19 vaccine (Pfizer) is preferred over the AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine in adults under 60 years old who have not already had a first dose of the AstraZeneca vaccine.

Is the AstraZeneca vaccine safe?

Yes. The individual benefit-to-risk balance of vaccination with the AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine varies with age.

This balance is based on factors including the increased risk of complications from COVID-19 with increasing age and the potential lower risk of this very rare, but serious, adverse event with increasing age.

I’ve had my first dose of the AstraZeneca vaccine, what do I do now?

If you have had your first vaccine dose without this side effect or other serious adverse effects, you should receive your second dose as planned. 

What if I’m worried about side effects?

If you have recently had your first vaccine dose and are experiencing any side effects that you are worried about, please chat with your doctor. 

I’m under age 60 and want the AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine, can you help?

Per recent government advice, if you’re aged 18-60, you can receive the AstraZeneca vaccine where the benefit of receiving it clearly outweighs the risk in your individual circumstance.

Staying up to date

It’s important to stay up to date with the latest COVID-19 advice from the state government and federal government.

Chat with your doctor

You can discuss your individual benefit-to-risk balance with your doctor. Simply make a booking with your regular GP.

Source: Australian Government Department of Health

Note: This information is of a general nature only and should not be substituted for medical advice. It does not replace consultations with qualified healthcare professionals to meet your individual medical needs. Page last updated 27 August 2021.

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Top 10 questions about COVID-19

Top 10 questions our doctors are asked about the COVID-19 vaccines

With more than 1,500 patients now vaccinated at PVH Medical, our doctors have been asked a lot of questions about the COVID-19 vaccines.

Some questions are asked more than others, and we’d like to share those with you today.

So, here are the top 10 questions our doctors are asked about the COVID-19 vaccines.

1. The vaccines arrived so fast. How do I know they’re safe?

COVID-19 vaccines went through the same safety checks as other vaccines. Rather than the science being sped up, the administrative and funding processes have been fast-tracked.

2. What are the side effects, and should I worry?

It’s normal to experience mild side effects. The most common ones include pain at the injection site, tiredness, headache, muscle pain, chills, joint pain and fever. These side effects are temporary and go away without treatment in 1-2 days.

Severe reactions to vaccines are very rare. Health experts are closely monitoring this.

3. Can you get COVID-19 from a COVID-19 vaccine?

No, you can’t. To get COVID-19, a live virus that can multiply in your body has to infect you. No vaccine supplied currently in the world contains live coronavirus.

4. Is it free?

Yes, COVID-19 vaccines are free for everyone in Australia, as per Australian government policy.

5. Can I choose which COVID-19 vaccine I get?

We’re currently giving AstraZeneca vaccines. In the coming months, other vaccinations will be available. We will advise when this happens. 

If you have any questions, please make an appointment with your usual doctor beforehand.

6. I’ve heard that AstraZeneca can cause blood clots. Is that true?

The AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine is associated with a very rare risk of a condition called thrombosis with thrombocytopenia syndrome, or TTS.

TTS involves blood clots (thrombosis) along with low platelet levels (thrombocytopenia), and occurs around 4-28 days after vaccination.

It’s currently estimated to affect around 6 people per million doses. To date, almost all reported cases were after the first dose of the vaccine.

Not all clots that occur after having the AstraZeneca vaccine will be due to TTS. Blood clotting problems occur commonly in the population.

Annually, common clots such as deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism (a clot in the lungs) will affect about 1 in a 1,000 people in Australia, unrelated to any vaccine.

7. I’ve had my first dose of AstraZeneca, can I switch to Pfizer for my second dose?

To be fully vaccinated against COVID-19 you must have two doses of the same vaccine.

If you’ve had your first dose of the AstraZeneca vaccine without developing TTS or experiencing another serious adverse event, then you can safely receive your second dose regardless of your age.

8. Why is AstraZeneca still recommended?

The AstraZeneca vaccine remains highly effective at preventing death and severe illness among people who have contracted COVID-19. The incidence of the blood clotting syndrome (TTS) is very rare.

The Australian Technical Advisory Group on Immunisation (ATAGI) has advised the AstraZeneca vaccine remains safe and is recommended to be given to people aged 50 years and over, and may be given to people aged 18-50 if the benefits clearly outweigh the risks.

The individual benefit-to-risk balance of vaccination with the AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine varies with age. This balance is based on factors including the increased risk of complications from COVID-19 with increasing age and the potential lower risk of this very rare, but serious, adverse event with increasing age.

9. Can I get the vaccine if I’ve recently had other vaccinations, such as the flu jab?

The preferred minimum interval between a dose of seasonal flu vaccine and a dose of the COVID-19 vaccine is 7 days.

Chat with your GP for more information when getting your routine vaccinations.

10. Will the COVID-19 vaccines be effective on new variants of the virus?

Current evidence from clinical trials indicates that the antibodies induced from COVID-19 vaccines are likely to provide protection to a variety of mutations and minor changes.

However, in some cases there may be an impact on how antibody developed from vaccines based on the original strain can ‘neutralise’ the virus.

This may mean that the effectiveness of the current vaccines against this particular strain could be affected. This information is still emerging and is being closely monitored.

In the same way that the influenza vaccine changes each season, the technology used to create the COVID-19 vaccines may be able to be adapted to changes in variants.

How to book

You can book in for a special vaccine clinic by calling 9304 0500.

If you can, print this consent form, fill it in and bring it with you to your appointment.

More information

If you’d like to find out more, take a read of these frequently asked questions. Or, make a booking with your GP and they’d be glad to answer your questions!

Source: Australian Government, SA Health, NCIRS, ABC

Note: This information is of a general nature only and should not be substituted for medical advice. It does not replace consultations with qualified healthcare professionals to meet your individual medical needs. Page last updated 3 September 2021.

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COVID-19 vaccine

Information on COVID-19 vaccines

If youve watched the news lately, you would have seen all the reports about the COVID-19 vaccine.

It’s important that you get accurate information about the vaccine, so please take a read of the information below.

How will the vaccination protect me?

A COVID-19 vaccination will help reduce the severity of COVID-19.

Getting vaccinated can also protect people around you, particularly those at increased risk of severe illness from COVID-19, like the elderly.

When can I get vaccinated?

Priority groups can expect to receive a vaccination from early 2021. For everyone else, it’s expected that the vaccine roll-out will continue throughout the year.

Who are the priority groups?

The government has identified these groups as:

  • People who have an increased risk of developing severe disease or dying from COVID-19:
    • Older people
    • People with certain pre-existing medical conditions
    • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people
  • People at an increased risk of exposure, infection and transmission of COVID-19, or are in a setting with high transmission potential:
    • Health and aged care workers
    • Other care workers such as group residential care and disability care workers
    • People in places like correctional and detention facilities, and meat processing plants.
  • People working in critical services:
    • Essential services staff such as emergency services providers, defence forces, public health staff and staff managing quarantine facilities
    • People working in supply and distribution of essential goods and services such as food, water, electricity, telecommunications and other critical infrastructure.

Here’s a chart of the government’s immunisation strategy (or visit here if you having trouble viewing it).

What can I do while I wait?

Whether you’re in a priority group or not, the best thing you can do is stay informed and continue to be COVIDSafe. Along with the government, we’ll provide more information about how vaccines will be rolled out over the coming months.

In the meantime, everyone still needs to:

  • Practise good hygiene
  • Maintain physical distance and wear a face mask where required
  • Stay home if you’re sick and get tested
  • Download the COVIDSafe app.

Is getting the vaccine compulsory?

No, you can choose not to vaccinate. But we’re calling on everyone to get vaccinated to help stop the spread of COVID-19 and get on with our daily lives.

Is the vaccine safe?

All vaccines are thoroughly tested for safety before they’re approved for use in Australia. This includes careful analysis of clinical trial data, ingredients, chemistry, manufacturing and other factors.

As with any vaccination, you may experience minor side effects afterwards like pain, redness or swelling where you received the needle, or a mild fever. You will be monitored after the vaccination.

Serious reactions like allergic reactions are extremely rare. Chat with your Pascoe Vale doctor if you have any concerns.

How are vaccines being tested?

Testing first begins with laboratory research, then animal studies and finally human clinical trials. Clinical trials involve testing the vaccine in thousands of volunteers, and are conducted in phases.

Before a COVID-19 vaccine is approved for use in Australia, it must pass the Therapeutic Goods Administration’s (TGA) rigorous assessment and approval processes. This includes assessment of its safety, quality and effectiveness.

What vaccine will I receive?

Australia has entered into four separate agreements for the supply of COVID-19 vaccines, if they’re proved to be safe and effective. You can read more about this here.

Read the special information about the AstraZeneca vaccine.

How many doses of the vaccine will I need?

There are two doses. After the first shot, you’ll need to return three weeks later (for the Pfizer vaccine) or three months later (for the AstraZeneca vaccine), or as advised by the Health Department.

I’m pregnant. Can I get vaccinated?

The government has released some information specifically for pregnant women. Chat with us if you have any questions.

Where can I get vaccinated?

The government is setting up special vaccination sites across the country.

We’re also running special vaccination clinics. This will ensure we can vaccinate as many people as possible in an efficient and COVIDSafe way.

We’ll keep you up-to-date by email, on our website, and on our Facebook page.

How much will it cost?

The vaccine will be free at government sites and our special vaccination clinics.

How will I know when it’s my turn to be vaccinated?

The government will be running a big advertising blitz – you won’t miss it!

We’ll also be in regular contact by email, on our website and on our Facebook page.

More information

Always get your information about vaccines from trusted sources, like your doctor at PVH Medical, the Department of Health or your local hospital.

Let’s fight this virus together!

Source: Department of Health

Note: This information is of a general nature only and should not be substituted for medical advice. It does not replace consultations with qualified healthcare professionals to meet your individual medical needs. Page last updated 16 June 2021.

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Telehealth update

Telehealth update

Need to see a healthcare professional in Pascoe Vale? Here’s how you can make a booking easily.

A face-to-face consultation

To see a doctor or allied health professional (e.g. physio, podiatrist, etc) simply book online here or call 9304 0500.

A telehealth consultation

If you would prefer a telehealth (over the phone) consultation, you must call 9304 0500.

Have a respiratory illness?

If you have any respiratory illness, such as sore throat, runny nose, cough or flu-like symptoms, you must call us to make a booking. Please do not book online.

Thank you!

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Woman wearing a face mask

Wearing a mask during the coronavirus pandemic

As you may know, you now need to wear a face covering (like a mask) whenever you leave your home.

This is one way we can help stop the spread of COVID-19 in our community.

So, next time you come into the clinic, don’t forget to bring your mask with you.

What masks are available?

There are two types of masks commonly available – disposable and cloth.

Cloth masks are good because they’re recyclable and better for the environment than disposable masks.

Cloth masks must fit snugly around your face. They should have three layers of closely woven fabric – cotton on the inside, cotton blend in the middle and a polyester outer layer.

P2 masks should not be used because they’re difficult to take on and off without contaminating your hands.

Where should I buy one from?

It’s best to purchase or make a proper mask according to Victorian Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) guidelines.

Pharmacies and post offices are good places to buy masks, as many sold on the internet may be inappropriate.

How should I care for my mask?

Cloth masks should be washed in hot water and detergent. It’s well known that hot water above 56°C can kill the virus.

Care is required when removing your mask to avoid touching the outer and inner surface of it.

Disposable masks must be put in the bin after each use.

Wearing a mask

Wash your masks in hot water.

What are the most important things to consider about masks?

Wearing a mask in public is mandatory in Melbourne when you leave your home for an essential reason, even if you feel or appear to be well.

Being well can be deceptive, as you can carry COVID-19 and not know it, unwittingly spreading the virus.

In fact, 80% of people who have contracted coronavirus have showed no symptoms or mild respiratory symptoms like a mild flu. This poses a real danger to those with chronic diseases and other high-risk groups for whom the virus is a major threat.

And remember, masks are not a replacement for social distancing, strict hand hygiene, and sneeze and cough etiquette.

It’ll take time to adjust

If you haven’t worn a mask before, we know it may feel a bit odd and uncomfortable to begin with.

But you’ll get used to it, and it’s one way we can help slow the spread of COVID-19 and protect each other.

Feeling unwell?

If you have any respiratory symptoms, no matter how mild, you should get tested for COVID-19.

Following your test, please stay at home until you get the all-clear.

As always, we’re here for you. If you have any questions, please give us a call on 9304 0500.

More information about coronavirus

 

Source: RACGP

Note: This information is of a general nature only and should not be substituted for medical advice. It does not replace consultations with qualified healthcare professionals to meet your individual medical needs.

Last updated 24 July 2020

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Coronavirus Stage 3 restrictions - healthy habits

Struggling with coronavirus restrictions? Here are 4 ways you can look after yourself

It can be easy to slip into bad habits or lose sight of our health goals when times are tough.

That’s why maintaining some healthy habits during the the government’s coronavirus Stage 3 restrictions is more important than ever.

So, here are some practical tips for maintaining and boosting your health at home, and how you can access our services for support.

Perhaps we can help you find a silver lining to the current situation!

1. Keep exercising

As well as boosting immunity, exercise can have a calming effect, keeping our minds clear and focused, and our anxiety contained.

That’s why it’s super important to keep exercising during the coronavirus Stage 3 restrictions.

There are lots of creative ways to create your own ‘home gym’, and you don’t need to go out and buy expensive exercise equipment. Grab a couple of soup tins from the kitchen cupboard – they make for great dumbbells!

In fact, many activities don’t require anything more than your body itself. For example, push-ups, planks and burpees are great for getting the heart pumping.

Remember to get outside as much as you can. Playgrounds and barbeque areas may be closed, but you can still go for a jog or brisk walk. Now there’s really no excuse to keep the dog locked up all day!

We suggest scheduling your exercise sessions. This will make it easier to stick to and help you get into a routine.

Not sure where to start? You can get a personal exercise program from our exercise experts. You can book in for a free initial telehealth session with our exercise physiologist or physiotherapists.

If you find exercising easier with other people, group classes are still available. We’ve reduced our exercise physiology class sizes to 1-3 people maximum. This means you can continue to maintain a social network during isolating times while at the same time help build up your immune system.

2. Establish an eating routine

For those of you who spend most of your time out of the house (at work, running errands etc), your daily routine may have centered around set meal and snack times.

However, with most of us either working from home, taking a break from work, or just spending more time in general at home, your old eating routines may have disappeared.

Without this same structure to your day, it’s easy to fall into bad habits. For example, having larger meals, extra snacking, or eating just for the sake of it! It’s easy to do, especially being so close to the kitchen.

To prevent overeating, and to promote healthier food choices, you could establish a new eating routine to match your needs at home. For example, consider these set times:

  • Breakfast: 8am
  • Morning tea: 11am
  • Lunch: 1.30pm
  • Afternoon tea: 4pm
  • Dinner: 7pm
  • Supper: 8.30pm

If you’re considering intermittent fasting as an option for weight management during isolation, an early morning black coffee could replace breakfast, while a herbal tea could replace supper at night.

You can take this a step further by planning what you choose to eat, and how much, at each set time. Always consider your energy needs – if you are less active at home, you may plan to eat less than usual (i.e. smaller or less frequent snacks).

If you would like some help establishing a new eating routine, or if you have other nutrition-related concerns, please speak with our in-house dietitian, Jessica Fuller. Private health and Medicare rebates are available.

3. Balance your thoughts

Worrying about diseases is a normal reaction. But excessive worrying can affect both our physical and mental health.

Fortunately, there are practical psychological skills to help you and your loved ones cope with anxiety.

When we get stressed about our health or risk of infection, our thoughts can become dark, brooding and pessimistic. Thoughts like, “How will I cope if I get sick?” and “I can’t deal with this”, are often triggered by stress, but they don’t help us. Negative and dark brooding thoughts will stop you doing things that can help.

Our thoughts are not always true or helpful. Challenge your negative thoughts by asking yourself what a friend would say in the same situation, or ask yourself what evidence do you have that you ‘won’t cope or can’t cope’? Whenever you recognise a negative thought, try to balance it with a realistic thought.

If you need help with balancing your thoughts, our psychologists Julie Paschke and Jenny Ricketts are here for you. You don’t need a referral to see a psychologist.

4. Shut down the noise (do things you like instead)

Stress is infectious, and often unhelpful. People tend to talk about things they are worried about. This creates lots of ‘noise’, which can create even more stress.

Give yourself permission to switch off ‘noise’ such as social media, news and the radio for most of each day.

Also give yourself permission to excuse yourself from people who are creating stress. Keep checking in to reliable news sources once or twice a day, but otherwise, turn down the ‘noise’.

Instead, replace it with things that can help you, including doing things you enjoy, like listening to music, riding your bike, yoga or even meditation.

You could also schedule a regular ‘event’, like a games night with those in your household, or your own version of a Gold Class cinema experience, complete with ice-creams and cardboard tickets that your kids can make.

Need help managing your stress levels? Have a chat with your Pascoe Vale doctor or psychologist – we’re always here to help.

Here’s how consultations are working

All consultations are currently being carried out over the phone or on video. In some cases you may be required to come in to the clinic.

 Telehealth
(consult over the phone)
Telehealth video
(consult over live video)
In-clinic
PsychologistYesZoom
Facetime
Yes
PodiatristYesCoviu
Zoom
Facetime
Yes
PhysiotherapistYesCoviu
Zoom
Facetime
Yes
Exercise physiologistYesCoviu
Zoom
Facetime
Yes
DietitianYesSkype
Zoom
Facetime
Yes
Speech pathologistYesZoom
Facetime
No

*In-clinic option is only available if your practitioner determines that your health needs cannot be managed by phone or video, or for hands-on care like podiatry and physiotherapy.

We’re here to support you

In addition to things like staying at home and practising good hygiene, focusing on some healthy habits and routines during the coronavirus Stage 3 restrictions will hold you in good stead.

Remember the famous saying, ‘this too shall pass’. It may not feel like it, but things will return to normal.

 

Source: MindSpot

Note: This information is of a general nature only and should not be substituted for medical advice. It does not replace consultations with qualified healthcare professionals to meet your individual medical needs.

Last updated 24 July 2020

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What you can do during coronavirus

Coronavirus – what you can do now

To help stop the spread of coronavirus in Australia and keep you and your loved ones safe, there are some important things you can do now.

1. Make a booking before coming in

Whether you need a doctor or one of our many allied health staff (like psychologists and podiatrists), you must make an appointment before you come in to the clinic.

To do this, simply call 9304 0500. You also can book online for a doctor.

Consultations are currently being carried out over the phone or video, known as telehealth. For some services, however, you’ll need to come in. Either way, we’ll let you know.

2. Stay at home

Unless you have to leave your home for an essential reason (like coming to see us), please stay at home.

3. Wear a face covering

When leaving your home for an essential reason, you must wear a face covering (like a mask).

Make sure you wear a mask at the clinic. If you have children with you who aren’t wearing a mask, we may ask you to wait in your car until called.

See this page for more information on masks.

4. Wash your hands often

By doing this you eliminate viruses that may be on your hands and avoid infection that could occur by then touching your eyes, mouth and nose.

Watch the video below for the correct way to wash your hands with soap and water.

[embedyt] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3PmVJQUCm4E[/embedyt]

Want to see how germs can spread so easily?

In the following 10-minute video ‘experiment’, watch what happens when fake germs are placed on just a few kids’ hands. It’s a great reminder for all of us!

[embedyt] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I5-dI74zxPg[/embedyt]

5. Cover your mouth and nose

Cough or sneeze into your elbow or cover your mouth and nose with a tissue.

This is because when someone coughs or sneezes, they spray small liquid droplets from their nose or mouth which may contain the virus.

[embedyt] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nz7z8L4tx1I[/embedyt]

6. Keep your distance

In addition to practising good personal hygiene as basic measures against the coronavirus, you should also practise what is known as social distancing.

This involves staying at least one and a half metres away from other people, especially if they’re coughing or sneezing.

Do your bit by avoiding handshaking and other physical greetings, and try to do your shopping online if you can.

7. Get tested and self-isolate

If you think you may have COVID-19, get tested and then self-isolate until you receive the all-clear.

Refer to this government website for more information about getting tested.

Woman with coronavirus

Get tested if you’re feeling unwell.

8. Stay safe in our clinic

When you come to our clinic, please don’t bring additional people into the waiting room.

If a family member needs help with translating, it’s best to do it over the phone. If you really need to accompany a family member, do the translating on the phone from inside your car and then come in if there are any issues.

If you have a child, bring your own items (e.g. toy, iPad) for your child to play with. This is because we’ve removed our toys from the waiting room.

Every little thing helps to stop the spread of the virus.

9. Practise good health habits

Changes to our daily lives, like social distancing, can affect our mental health, fitness and occupational health.

People are spending much more time in their home, so we need to try to adapt our daily lives.

Things like getting plenty of sleep, being physically active, managing stress, drinking lots of water and eating nutritious foods are particularly important.

Here’s a great guide to help you navigate the change.

10. Look after yourself and each other

Staying healthy should be your number one priority right now. It’s also important to reach out to elderly relatives and neighbours to help them reduce their risk.

There are lots of myths about coronavirus. It’s therefore important that you keep following the advice of doctors and healthcare practitioners, as well as the state and federal government.

Together, we’ll get through this.

Source: Department of Health and World Health Organization

Note: This information is of a general nature only and should not be substituted for medical advice. It does not replace consultations with qualified healthcare professionals to meet your individual medical needs.

Last updated 24 July 2020

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Coronavirus

Coronavirus information

*If you have symptoms of coronavirus or you’ve recently been in close contact with someone who has coronavirus, please call us immediately. Don’t come to the clinic without calling us first.*

Coronavirus, also known as COVID-19, is a new virus that has spread into our community.

To ensure you’re best prepared, it’s important you read the following information.

What are the symptoms of coronavirus?

The symptoms to watch out for include:

  • Fever
  • Chills or sweats
  • Cough
  • Sore throat
  • Shortness of breath
  • Runny nose
  • Loss of sense of smell or taste.

In some cases, symptoms may even include things like vomiting and diarrhoea.

How can you help prevent coronavirus?

There are numerous things you can do to protect you and your loved ones.

For example:

  • Stay at home (wear a mask if you have to leave your home for essential reasons)
  • Practise social distancing of at least 1.5 m
  • Practise good hygiene:
    • Clean your hands for at least 20 seconds with soap and water, or an alcohol-based hand sanitiser
    • Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue or flexed elbow when coughing and sneezing
  • Avoid close contact with anyone who may be sick.

For more information on how you can stop the spread of coronavirus, please read this article.

Is there a cure or vaccine?

Currently there is no vaccine available to prevent coronavirus, and there’s no specific treatment to cure it.

People with more serious complications can be treated in hospital.

What should you do if you think you have coronavirus?

If you feel sick or you’ve recently been in close contact with someone who may have coronavirus, you should call us straight away.

Don’t come to the clinic without calling us first.

We’re here for you

Please don’t panic – we’re well prepared for virus outbreaks and here to help you.

If you have any questions or need to see us, please call 9304 0500.

For coronavirus updates, you can refer to the Victorian Government website or call the Coronavirus Health Information Line on 1800 020 080.

 

Note: This information is of a general nature only and should not be substituted for medical advice. It does not replace consultations with qualified healthcare professionals to meet your individual medical needs.

Last updated 24 July 2020

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Online bookings are currently unavailable. Please call us instead. Consultations are being carried out over the phone or on video (telehealth) unless your practitioner requires you to come in to the clinic. Face-to-face COVID-19 vaccination clinics are still running.